Outdoor Maths

Weather

It is too good to be inside so don't let a timetabled Maths lesson prevent you from enjoying the great outdoors. Get out and enjoy the sun, fresh air and the rich environment where Maths really happens. Even if the weather is not perfect you could dress up warmly and brave the elements.

Being outdoors gives you a lot more space to involve the pupils in mathematical ideas. They can take measurements, conduct surveys, model mathematical concepts or play big style maths games.

Below you will find some ideas to get you started but please let me know if you come up with a great idea worth sharing.

Finally, if it's hot remember to guard against the strong sunlight and drink plenty of water. If it's cold keep moving! Enjoy.

People Maths

People Maths

Get your students involved by acting out mathematical ideas and concepts so that they become part of the situation and gain a greater understanding.

Get Out!

Scavenger Hunt

Scavenger Hunt

Collect as many of the items as possible. Each item will be awarded a mark out of ten for it's quality or the ingenuity involved in finding it.

Get Out!

River Crossing

River Crossing

You do not need a real river to go through the moves required to solve this puzzle. Mark imaginary river banks with string and have a bottomless cardboard box as the boat.

Get Out!

Snail Race

Snail Race

Wouldn't it be fun to see twelve pupils lined us as the 'snails' in this probability lesson. Each snail moves forward one step if their number comes up as the sum of two dice.

Get Out!

Transum,

Saturday, June 29, 2019

"When you are outdoors there are lots of opportunities to collect data that can be later analysed back in the classroom. Being involved in data collection on a small scale helps pupils better appreciate large data sets.
Here are some ideas:
Measuring the circumference of trees and their distances from a stream
Recording the types of vehicles travelling along a busy road next to your school
Mapping the location and type of litter found in the school grounds
Recording statistics on Sports Day."

Thara, Ellison

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

"My five year old and I did a simulating joint numeracy and literacy lesson today partly in the open air. On the way to the shop, we counted the number of cars we saw parked on the street. In the shop she practiced counting out money and improved her level of patience as well. She also had the chance to practice writing. It was fun! One of the exercises involved time. Another task she had to do was look for five shapes in the shop. Every time she found one of the shapes, I made a note of it. Back at home I asked her to put all the information into a bar chart. We sorted the cars according to color and then she carefully drew a bar chart of that information. As a additional extension challenging literacy exercise in the following lesson, I told her to write a short report detailing her findings. I may use that exercise again in the future. To conclude the lesson, I asked her to give me some constructive oral feedback on the lesson. For the next math lesson, I may present her with some easy questions on the bar chart for her to answer. Or I can practice drawing bar charts with her and check she can do this independently too. This is a fun cool website. I may get the kids to play the math games to practice their skills."

Do you have any comments? It is always useful to receive feedback and helps make this free resource even more useful for those learning Mathematics anywhere in the world. Click here to enter your comments.

Apple

©1997-2020 WWW.TRANSUM.ORG