Boxing Day

Present  Present  Present  Present

The ball is next to and inbetween the calculator and the abacus.

The diary is next to and on the immediate right of the abacus.

The three presents on the left cost a total of £19.

The three presents on the right cost a total of £20.

The calculator costs twice as much as the ball.

The abacus costs £3 more than the diary.

Work out the contents and the cost of the Christmas boxes from the given clues

The Day After Christmas Maths Lesson Starter

Topics: Starter | Problem Solving | Puzzles | Simultaneous Equations | Xmas

  • Transum,
  • Wednesday, November 25, 2015
  • "Did you enjoy this puzzle for boxing day? What could be more appropriate than solving a problem involving boxes! The history of boxing day, adapted from the Wikipedia entry, is as follows.

    'The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era metal boxes placed outside of churches were used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom, it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth-century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts on the day after Christmas in return for good and reliable service throughout the year. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800s, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. However, the exact etymology of the term "boxing" is unclear and for which there are several competing theories, none of which is definitive'."

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Globe of Flags

This activity is suitable for students of mathematics all around the world. Use the button below to change the currency symbol used to make it more relevant to your students. You may wish to choose an unfamiliar currency to extend your students' experience.

Globe of Flags


Christmas Present Ideas

Seasonal, mathematics-related gifts chosen and recommended by Transum Mathematics

Laptops In Lessons

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Do they have Laptops in Lessons or iPads?

Whether your students each have a TabletPC, a Surface or a Mac, this activity lends itself to eLearning (Engaged Learning).

Laptops In Lessons

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Here is something a little more relaxing for the day after Christmas.

Student Activity



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