Roman Numerals Jigsaw

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Description Help Roman Numerals Quiz
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Drag the jigsaw pieces onto the frame so that the Roman numerals are in order from smallest to largest.

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Description of Levels

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Level 1 - 6 by 5 grid starting at 1

Level 2 - 6 by 6 grid starting at a number between 3 and 9

Level 3 - 7 by 7 grid starting at a number between 33 and 49

Level 4 - 8 by 7 grid starting at a number between 70 and 88

Level 5 - 8 by 8 grid starting at a number between 450 and 470

See alse the Roman Numerals Quiz.

Roman Numerals

If you aren't an expert on Roman numerals here is an explanation:

SymbolValue
I1
V5
X10
L50
C100
D500
M1,000

Numbers are formed by combining symbols together. So II is two ones, i.e. 2, and XIII is a ten and three ones, i.e. 13. There is no zero in this system, so 207, for example, is CCVII, using the symbols for two hundreds, a five and two ones. 1066 is MLXVI, one thousand, fifty and ten, a five and a one.

Symbols are placed from left to right in order of value, starting with the largest. However, in a few specific cases, to avoid four characters being repeated in succession (such as IIII or XXXX) these can be reduced using subtractive notation as follows:

Explanation adapted from the Wikepedia article on Roman numerals.

Don't wait until you have finished the exercise before you click on the 'Check' button. Click it often as you work through the questions to see if you are answering them correctly.

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Teachers

If you found this activity useful don't forget to record it in your scheme of work or learning management system. The short URL, ready to be copied and pasted, is as follows:

"Learning Roman numerals is in the National curriculum in England for Key Stage 2.

Year 3: Tell and write the time.... using Roman numerals from I to XII

Year 4: Read Roman numerals to 100 (I to C) and know that, over time, the numeral system changed to include the concept of zero and place value

Year 5: Read Roman numerals to 1000 (M) and recognise years written in Roman numerals.

Roman numerals should be put in their historical context so pupils understand that there have been different ways to write whole numbers and that the important concepts of zero and place value were introduced over a period of time."

National Curriculum Document,
Sunday, September 1, 2013

 

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