Chess

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Chess is believed to have originated in Eastern India but the game we know today dates back to the 15th century.

The game above is interactive. You can drag the pieces to move them. If a piece lands on a square occupied by another piece, that piece is removed from the board.

There are also a number of mathematical chess puzzles that you can find below.

Game Rules

This is a game for two players. One player controls the black pieces and the other controls the white pieces. Players take it in turns (starting with white) to move one of their pieces. If their piece lands on the same square as an opposing piece is situated the landed on piece is out of the game.

The objective is to have the opposing king in a position that he is under attack (check) and cannot move to another square that is not under attack (checkmate).

Moves

King

The king can move one square in any direction (vertically, horizontally or vertically).

Queen

The queen can move any number of squares in any direction (vertically, horizontally and vertically). The queen cannot jump over pieces and if she takes an opponent's piece her move ends.

Rook

The rook (or castle) can move any number of squares either vertically or horizontally. The rook cannot jump over pieces and if it takes an opponent's piece its move ends.

Knight

The knight can jump over other pieces. Its move is restricted to two squares vertically or horizontally followed by a move of one square in a perpendicular direction.

Bishop

The bishop can move any number of squares diagonally. The bishop cannot jump over pieces and if it takes an opponent's piece its move ends.

Pawn

The pawn can can move one square (or on its first move two squares) forward apart from if it is taking an opponents piece when it must move one square diagonally. If a pawn makes it across to the opposite side of the board it is promoted to be a queen.

Castling

A king can move two squares over to one side and then the rook from that side's corner move to the king on the opposite side. In order to castle it must be that king and rook's very first move, there cannot be any pieces between the king and rook and the king may not be in check or pass through check.

Mathematical Puzzles

King Independence

Arrange as many kings as possible on the chess board so that none of the pieces attack each other.

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Queen Independence

Arrange as many queens as possible on the chess board so that none of the pieces attack each other.

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Rook Independence

Arrange as many rooks as possible on the chess board so that none of the pieces attack each other.

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Knight Independence

Arrange as many knights as possible on the chess board so that none of the pieces attack each other.

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Bishop Independence

Arrange as many bishops as possible on the chess board so that none of the pieces attack each other.

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King Domination

Arrange the minimum number of kings on the chess board so that all free squares of the board are attacked by at least one piece.

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Queen Domination

Arrange the minimum number of queens on the chess board so that all free squares of the board are attacked by at least one piece.

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Rook Domination

Arrange the minimum number of rooks on the chess board so that all free squares of the board are attacked by at least one piece.

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Knight Domination

Arrange the minimum number of knights on the chess board so that all free squares of the board are attacked by at least one piece.

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Bishop Domination

Arrange the minimum number of bishops on the chess board so that all free squares of the board are attacked by at least one piece.

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